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Amistar on a high speed wave

Product Update
11.03.2016

Today’s potato planters work faster than ever before, with modern belt planters capable of operating at 10 to 12 km/hr - up to three times faster than conventional cup machines. That has implications for all integrated applications on the planter, including fertiliser, seed treatment and Amistar.

“Reducing soil-borne Black Dot infection with Amistar has consistently shown to deliver cleaner, brighter, premium skin finish tubers at harvest and after storage,” added Douglas.

“It is especially important for minimising the build-up of Black Dot infection on tubers at the end of the season – which can buy growers crucial extra protection if harvest is delayed.”

Douglas also pointed out that, with the multitude of operations often taking place on the planter, the design of any applicators must assure reliability and simplicity. “The operator’s attention is focussed on consistency and depth of seed tuber planting; everything else needs to be as automated as possible.”

Existing best practice is to apply with two nozzles mounted in the planter share; one at the front, to spray the soil as it is opening, and a second mounted at the rear, to spray onto the soil as the furrow is closed back in. The aim is to get all the spray onto the soil, without direct spray onto the seed tuber.

Syngenta Technical Manager, Douglas Dyas, highlighted the company’s new application trials are looking to assure Amistar spray treatments are targeting the wave of soil generated by planters at higher speeds. 

“It’s evident there is real potential to get a greater mix of soil and spray, to create an extremely effective zone of protection around the seed tuber,” advised Douglas Dyas.

“Redesigning the positioning of the nozzles and providing a shield for the seed tuber could enable improved accuracy and mixing in the soil, and ensure a clean start for fast crop emergence,” he reported.

The Amistar in-furrow treatment is aimed at reducing the levels of Black Dot and Rhizoctonia pathogen in the soil.

“The better the mix of Amistar in the soil, the greater the potential benefit in terms of efficacy.”

Targeting Rhizoctonia at planting can minimise the effect of stem pruning and shoot damage on the emerging crop, as well as producing more consistent tuber size and shape, with fewer cracks and knobbles and reduced risk of Black Scurf at harvest. 

“Reducing soil-borne Black Dot infection with Amistar has consistently shown to deliver cleaner, brighter, premium skin finish tubers at harvest and after storage,” added Douglas.

“It is especially important for minimising the build-up of Black Dot infection on tubers at the end of the season – which can buy growers crucial extra protection if harvest is delayed.”

Douglas also pointed out that, with the multitude of operations often taking place on the planter, the design of any applicators must assure reliability and simplicity. “The operator’s attention is focussed on consistency and depth of seed tuber planting; everything else needs to be as automated as possible.”

Existing best practice is to apply with two nozzles mounted in the planter share; one at the front, to spray the soil as it is opening, and a second mounted at the rear, to spray onto the soil as the furrow is closed back in. The aim is to get all the spray onto the soil, without direct spray onto the seed tuber. 


Top Five Tips for Amistar application in the field:

  • Use two nozzles per row in-furrow

  • Ensure nozzles are spraying onto the soil

  • Clod free seedbeds give better mix

  • Keep pre-mixed Amistar solution agitated at all times; apply in a minimum of 50 l/ha of water

  • Flush through direct injection lines every day


Douglas reminded growers that Amistar applicators do need to be NSTS tested annually, and should be fully serviced ready for the season. He also advocated all applicators should ideally be fitted with nozzle sensors, to quickly identify any flow reduction or soil particle blockages.

Trials with new application equipment are being undertaken with operators during planting this season, with results and advice available to all growers ready for next year.